Posted : 8 months ago
Classic News - Sec. Of The Navy James Forrestal | "On The Battle Of Iwo Jima"

dontouchthatdial:

Classic News - Secretary Of The Navy - James Forrestal

On The Battle Of Iwo Jima

original airdate : Feb, 25, 1945 

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We hope that tonight’s stories will make you a little uncomfortable when you hear that chuckle coming from behind your closet door in the middle of the night.  On second thought, you wouldn’t need tonight’s tales for that situation. 

Posted : 8 months ago

The Man Who Was Shot Twice By One Bullet

historical-nonfiction:

It all started in 1883, when Henry Ziegland broke off a relationship with his girlfriend, who then killed herself. Her brother, crazy with grief, vowed to kill Ziegland. He hunted him down and shot him. Believing Ziegland dead, the brother then turned the gun on himself. But Ziegland wasn’t dead: the bullet had only grazed his face and then lodged in a large tree behind him.

Years later, Ziegland decided to cut down the tree. The task seemed so tough that he decided to blow it up with a few sticks of dynamite. The explosion turned the tree into lots of flying shrapnel — including the bullet, which stuck Ziegland’s head, killing him instantly. It took decades, but the brother eventually did what he vowed.

Posted : 8 months ago

historical-nonfiction:

This is the remarkable Lady Malcolm Douglas-Hamilton. In 1940 she was Natalie Latham, a former debutante and fixture at New York society balls, now 30, twice divorced with two children and still so beautiful that Vogue printed items about her.

All this changed when German U-boats began their devastating attacks on the North Atlantic convoys supplying Britain. Although America had not entered the war, Natalie Latham decided to do something to help, and established Bundles for Britain, which began as little more than a “knitting bee” — albeit one convened by Natalie Latham and some of the grandest dames of the New York social scene. The group quickly expanded to over 1.5 million volunteers, with branches all over the country. Bundles for Britain started shipping over not just clothing but also blankets, children’s cots, ambulances, X-ray machines, hospital beds, oxygen tents, surgical instruments, blood transfusion kits, tinned food and children’s cots. Every item was labelled “From your American friends.”

In Britain, she secured the support of Winston Churchill’s wife, Clementine, and of Janet Murrow, wife of the CBS reporter Ed Murrow, whose live radio broadcasts to America during the Blitz began with the words: “This is London.” When Bundles for Britain held a raffle, Queen Elizabeth donated items, including a piece of shrapnel that had hit Buckingham Palace. King George VI later appointed Natalie Latham an honorary CBE; she was the first non-British woman thus honored.

After her fourth husband’s  death in 1951, she arrived in London to promote Common Cause, an anti-communist organization she had founded, and met the third son of the 13th Duke of Hamilton, Lord Malcolm Douglas-Hamilton, MP for Inverness-shire and an ardent anti-communist. They eventually moved to the US, and she died on January 14, 2013.

Posted : 8 months ago

historical-nonfiction:

The first light portrait and first human portrait every taken. From October or November, 1839. It is a self-portrait by Robert Cornelius.

Posted : 8 months ago

historical-nonfiction:

So this guy is Captain America in real life. When war broke out after Pearl Harbor in 1942, Audie Murphy saw the armed forces as a way to help support his family and serve his country.  He tried to enlist, but was still to young for the service.  As soon as he turned 18 he went to the Marine Corps recruiter begging to join up.  The Marines took one look at little Audie - he was five feet five inches tall and one hundred ten pounds - and determined that he was too small for the service.  The Navy guys told him the same thing.  The Army had no qualms about throwing Murphy into the meat grinder however, and shipped him off to North Africa as part of the US 3rd Infantry Division.

He played around in the desert in North Africa, then helped invade Sicily, then got medals for bravery on D-Day and in the subsequent liberation of France. His actions also got him promoted to Second Lieutenant. While fighting in the Holzwihr forest in January 1945, he was told to defend a critical pocket from the Germans with 19 men, all that was left of his 128-man company. Against two Nazi companies and six tiger tanks. And he did it, because he is Captain America. When Audie returned home, he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

He served some time in the Texas National Guard, retiring at the rank of Major.  After his military service, Audie Murphy went on to be a badass movie action hero, starring in a number of Westerns and even playing himself in the autobiographical To Hell and Back.  He was eventually given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Posted : 8 months ago

historical-nonfiction:

The name Adolf was actually quite popular, as well as common, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is a compound derivation from the Old High German word “adal” or “athal,” meaning “noble” or “high,” and the word “wulf” meaning “wolf.” So Adolf essentially translates to “Noble Wolf,” a strong, upstanding sort of name. However, being associated with Hitler has, seemingly forever, demonized the meaning of Adolf. Since World War II, almost no babies have been given this once popular name.

Posted : 8 months ago
Posted : 8 months ago

historical-nonfiction:

San Francisco after the Great Earthquake of 1906.

Posted : 8 months ago

Civil War Casualties

historical-nonfiction:

A few odder facts about the American Civil War’s killed and injured

  • the first deaths of the U.S. Civil War did not take place on the battlefield. On April 19, 1861, four Union soldiers were stoned to death in Baltimore by a mob of rebel sympathizers.
  • the first battle of the American Civil War, at Fort Sumter, was also the least bloodless of the war, with no deaths or injuries.
  • the person who fired the first shot of the American Civil War, Confederate Edward Ruffin, committed suicide after the Confederate surrender at Appomattox
  • in the Battle of Cold Harbor, 7,000 Americans were killed in the span of 20 minutes.
Posted : 8 months ago

historical-nonfiction:

In the 1904 Olympics, American gymnast George Eyser faired quite well, winning six medals even though his left leg was made of wood.